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significant impact on this country, and left us a large legacy. i can just sort of recite some of the things that he did. but even that wouldn't even touch in any way the fullness and the breadth of his impact on late 19th century america. again, most of us know he served five terms in congress. he served in the south carolina senate. he served in the south carolina house. and, of course, he was the collector of customs for the port of buford. but beyond those things, he provides us with sort of an understanding and a way of reinterpreting reconstruction, a way of reinterpreting the civil rights movement. now -- so he sort of brings together those two fields. you heard dr. powers allude to his being sort of the precursor to the second reconstruction because of what he did in the 19th century. well, let me start this way by talking about reconstruction and robert smalls' a role in it. you'll see how these two things come together in terms of how he has influenced american historiography. in 1909, w.e.b. dubois spoke before the american historical association in new york city. he did a present
an event al attack by u.s. army forces. they will be defeated. the army will evacuate but the navy will keep up a presence throughout the war. in the meantime, besides the military, actions that are going on, there is going to be this sort of start of reconstruction. i'm not going to go into a great deal of this. but part of this will be taking smalls to the north. to help raise public knowledge. slaves could be part of this military force. smalls is the perfect example of this. dupont was weary of this. he said if you are going to do this, you might as well turn robert over to bartam and let him put him on display. the frepnch wanted a moral impression. at the same time dupont could not spare him. he also thanks to dupont, smalls and the male members of the vessel coming out will receive prize money. prize money is something that would be taken to a prize court. then the value of the ship, smalls and the other dupont bro the secretary of the navy suggested that the others make the prize money available to them. he eventually purchased the home of his former master. another key pla
. join us for hot dogs and garlic fries. all that and more on "cbs this fries. all that and more on "cbs this morning saturday," july 7, 2012. captioning funded by cbs >>> it is a core scorcher of a saturday we join us. >> it's supposed to hit 100 here in. >> you think about new york, chicago, all across the country. we begin with that heat wave. it will not quit. excessive heat warnings are going to remain in place today for much of the country and in some places high humidity will even make it feel hotter. it certainly does here in new york. over a dozen people have died and the nation's power grid is also being pushed to the limit. we head outside to lonnie quinn for the latest. he's braving it for us. it is going to get hot, very hot here. it's going to get hot where you live as well. this heat is something else. day after sweltering day from the gateway arch in st. louis to chicago's lakefront to times square in new york city, the triple digit temperatures just will not quit. 238 cities to be exact have set all-time highs in the last 30 days. according to weather historian chris bur
economic news three months in a row now. are people just used to it? is it baked in? do they just accept where this economy is? we hope not. we hope that we don't accept these numbers regardless of the politics of it. you hope people don't accept this as a new norm. >> do they think that mitt romney could do better? >> that's the big question. >> we're going to explore all of that this morning. let us know what you think. find us on twitter. rest of your headlines. a lot more to tell you '. there has been a drone strike in northwestern pakistan and killed at least 15 suspected taliban militants. pakistani intelligence says this happens in a village in north waziristan. four missiles fired at compound believed to be owned by taliban commander. this comes as tension grows over those american drone strikes in the country. it's the first strike since pakistan reopened nato supply routes this past week. george zimmerman is a free man yet again this morning. here he is leaving a florida jail after posting the required 10 pierce of his $1 million bond. is he now staying in a temporary safe hous
of fuel to the campaign. the u.s. economy added only 80,000 jobs. the unemployment rate remained unchanged at 8.2%. the president on the defensive. david kerley is following the president. >> reporter: it didn't take long for romney to come off vacation and go on the attack. the president tried to make the case that the economy is still adding jobs. it didn't take long for the two candidates to respond. >> it's still tough out there. we have to grow the economy faster and put more people back to work. >> we have seen the jobs report this morning. and it is another kick in the gut. to middle class families. >> reporter: here's what's happened. in the first three months, good job growth. in the last three months, call it lackluster. >> the economy is recovering. it's a slow, falters, frustrating economy. >> reporter: on a bus tour through ohio, the spt arguing that more needs to be done. when he said this about job growth -- >> it's a step in the right direction. >> reporter: -- mitt romney pounced. he said creating 80,000 jobs is no step in the right direction. >> american families are sfru
of their color out of an american vessel, be they free or otherwise. it is possible that the u.s. government could have followed harrison's suggestion and taken the dispute before the mixed commission jointly set about between the u.s. and britain to deal with such cases but in the end, they chose not to do so. the anderson case is erie similar to another case involving a fugitive slave also known as john anderson who fled to canada at the end of the decade to avoid prostitution for murder. arrested and brought before the court of queen's bench, anderson was finally freed on a technicality following intense public pressure on the british government organized in london by the foreign anti-slaveried society. both cases also raised questions about the political reach of american fugitive slave laws and the many ways opponents found to resist the enforcement at home and abroad. as in so many other instances, it was anderson, handy and lois who took the decision to act, to get on board the ships in baltimore and charleston and doing so they opened up a heated debate with international repercussio
talks about how slaves used the u.s. mail to communicate with other slaves and how they planned and executed escapes to canada, mexico and the caribbean. held at penn state university this is an hour and 15 minutes. >> thank you, tony. that was almost ministerial. i feel as if i'm really in church now. okay. it's an honor to be here. thanks for making this possible. it's wonderful to be in penn state in march and see people in shorts. there is something to be said for global warming. let me suggest a couple of things as we start -- before we start rattling on tonight. one is i'm going to set this discussion these series of lectures beginning with the fugitive slave law of 1850. to me the pivotal political event in the decade leading up to the civil war. the fugitive slave law changes the political dynamics of this country in ways that nobody could have anticipated at the time. and at the center of that change in political dynamic are the activities of slaves themselves who run away. so what i am interested in looking at in the series of lectures then is how does the action of th
knew the answer but that did little too ease his concern. slaves who had left the south used the postal system to communicate with loved ones and friends left behind. the reverend robert ryeland, the white minister of the first african church of virginia railed be ernst receiving letters -- his congregation receiving letters from former members of his church who had escaped in which they described the best ways to reach freedom. the use of the mail rivalled slave holders who prohibited its use to disseminate abolitionist materials. starting in 1851, mail sent between new york and california, for example was charged a flat rate of 3 cents per half ounce. this meant that anyone, and that included fugitive slaves like banks could correspond with family and friends cheaply. slaves contemplating escape sometimes made plans with friends and family already in the north and in canada before leaving. a man with the unfortunate name of john bull and joe mayor, two of the five run aways found on a steam ship in the james river in 1858 knew where they were going. bull had arranged with friends in c
. that action freed himself, his family and 12 other slaves. he went onto become a republican member of the u.s. house. this is two hours. >> good afternoon. my name is joe divey and it is my pleasure to welcome you to this wonderful celebration of an american hero. i get to do something tonight that pastors seldom get to do. i get to do the first part and then i get to sit down and shut up. our modtraitor is the great great grandson of robert smalls. he is think experienced executive with the strong and dynamic career driving growth and innovation an consumer marketing companies. and marketing management with the general management and leadership skill to offer a blend of management capabilities he has earned a degree from the maxwell school and from the school of business at duke university and it is my pleasure to present to you mr. michael moore. [ applause ] >> good evening. it has been a wonderful day here in charleston. we started this morning at the charleston museum and there were a couple of very meaningful unveilings on the harbor. and we are capping the evening off with really rich
. sometimes that helps create jobs in the u.s., sometimes it doesn't. that's the political point. >> more than sometimes, more than sometimes, adam. come on, you know it's more than sometimes. >> no, i don't know. >> oh, see, are you telling me that you, in all your great research, have found that private equity is a net job killer? not a net job creator? >> i'm saying that creating jobs in the united states in some sort of-- in some jurisdiction is not the job of a private equity investors and that isn't what i would want them to do. >> no, you're a business reporter. >> i agree that investing in education and infrastructure, what we should be doing, nothing objectionable. >> adam, you and you cover this stuff, to are a long time. this is a pretty simple question, do they create jobs or kill jobs? based on my research, they create a lot more jobs, what are you saying? >> yeah, but charlie, we could have the same debate about, you know, do firefighters or police forces create jobs. >> no, we can't. >> or-- >> i think that there serves as a reminder, what maybe the administration really wants.
of the work that he did actually laid the ground work for the second reconstruction. another term used to describe the american civil rights movement. secondly, smalls' life is a consummately american story. a story of triumph over adversity, success against the odds, and of course what better place to talk about such an american life than in charleston, smalls' second home and indeed a city unique in its contributions to americana and those things that would become afro americana. i want to talk about smalls' later life. i want to talk about his experiences in beaufort, but mainly in charleston as a way of understanding how these environments prepared him for his later achievements in life. now robert smalls is born in 1839 in beaufort, he's the son of lydia polite, who was the son of -- mckee was a planter and he owned approximately 60 different people who he used mainly in the country side. but lydia and robert comprised the main part of his domestic labor force at his beaufort home. know domestic service had its positive aspects and it's disadvantages for example. domestics were on
to be adding jobs right now. >> that those so-called job creators will make everything okay for the rest of us. we believe that the way to build this country is the way we always have, from the middle out. that's how it's always been done. and the way to do that is invest in the things that have always made our economy grow. innovation, research, development, infrastructure, and education. >> are you looking at the folks behind the vice-president, did it not look like a hostage tape. you've got a government spending more than a trillion bucks on jobs and bang for those bucks and now he wants to spend more of your bucks on jobs. so we're asking this morning, what the buck? and charlie gasperino, dagen mcdowell and dr. payne. >> if that was, communist russia would be the most powerful in the country. >> a lot floating around d.c. these days. >> might want to be careful-- >> and to express this little faith in american citizens, they go out and knock ambition and denigrate success, it's ridiculous. >> i thought the audience was stepford audience. >> neil: look at the crowd behind him they look d
'scoin uecoeyomnt a e b wir core wyhe mocl oth us to get a book from the book of the month club every month. and i can't remember how far soinkes a fy,s, but she ted ok tisrtok in retrospect i keep thinking now how did she expect a kind of hyperverbal, hyperlerarkid rt e es tt? meelrdhe bk d se,nd of thhith ithk was hugely liberating for me was that i had read mainly in the 19th century when i hadbeen inul b. i ohaetar d ibinto m know that you could write in this kind of vernacular. i mean, the book is written, written with a vryst, u laycebu or e, v eronve flip pant in -- flippant in places. it does have this attitude about sex which, of course, i fo mplyyeniuto mo latatl p ialee learn about, um, untying the kind of ties th d the liof19en. , d ed m a reifnt o inicsale. d illnk i mean, i gave it, i gave it to my sons who were, are really, really inveterate reers as isi csendtto m st ss emeel adryer veal ,n he was 13, i think it was. because i think sometimes when you're a 13 or 14-ar-o b u l f ol liou'tlkwnhe reit tinou dha t'sth d raalngdod idoing the same when, in fact, every other 13
localized and you see more slaves and free blacks being used on the steam ships operating along the coast. it was said that the term pilot was only reserved for whites. the planter will operate along the coast after the firing on fort sumter. she will be found between jacksonville, florida, up to charleston and going up to geor georgetown. linton off the southern coast to stop the importantation off the coast and the exportations used to buy military goods to europe. trying to stop any training now. the problem was, to have an effective blockade you have to have staemeamed war ships, you e to have places you need coaling stations. forward to have a stronger blockade. you have to have seizing harbors along the coast line. and on november # 7th, 1861, with 17 vessels, the largest fleet ever organized by the united states up to this time will seize port royal sound. they will drive away the confederate army and the vast majority of the land owners and the planters within the sea islands. they will come ashore and control 8,000 slaves. though not initially prepared to deal with the slaves, th
used by sierra pacific industries and its timber partners caused a massive fire in two counties. both sides settled the lawsuit without disclosing the terms. the government was seeking $700 million. >>> a san jose church choir will be singing a capella tomorrow after burglars stole $25,000 worth of musical instruments. father john fadigo says burglars have broken into the music storage room at our lady of guadalupe church three times in the past two weeks. the church has changed the lock on the storage room but the burglars manage to get in. the father says band members are devastated and have spend countless hours holding fund- raisers to try to buy the instruments. >> this place is held together by dental floss and duct tape. we're struggling to make ends meet. there's not money available immediately to get these instruments replaced. >> the church has put out a donation box to help with replacing the instruments. >>> new this morning, at least 78 people have died after heavy rains triggered flash floods overnight in southern russia. 67 of the deaths are in the hard hit town of crin
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)